Fireborn Publishing Promises...

Fireborn Publishing promises to authors that we will...

1. …be true to the EPIC Code of Conduct for publishers.
2. …pay authors first…always. Owner pay comes out of the budget last. We will not spend money until authors are paid. Period. When the opportunity arises, we will reinvest money in growing the business.
3. …consider all suggestions brought to us seriously, at a monthly meeting between owner staff, whether the suggestions come from authors, editors, or readers.
4. …allow our staff to do what they do best, within their budgets, without micromanagement.
5. …departments support other departments as much as we can. Streamlining the job for everyone lightens the load.
6. …help our authors to promote/market their work to the best of our ability, teach new authors to promote/market themselves, and be available to answer all questions authors have.
7. …write and maintain an ebook for authors, giving answers to commonly-asked questions, and maintain active communication between authors and contacts in the individual departments.
8. ...Maintain PDF copies of royalty reports and book copies online, so authors can download their copies, in perpetuity.

Friday, February 27, 2015

New Release from Fireborn today






New release available today from Fireborn Publishing!
Hand Job by Spencer Dryden
contemporary erotic romance
$0.99 in ebook


Jack Reed is a thirty-something handyman and aspiring erotic fiction writer with fantasies about Jodie, a barista at the coffee shop where he writes every day.

His dreams begin to materialize when Jodie offers him a quick palm reading, hinting at sex with her. She invites Jack to her boutique for a more complete session. Her reading predicts Jack's artisan hands will be pleasing to a woman. Their session interrupted, she invites him to her house that evening for further revelation.

Uncertain of Jodie's intentions, but drawn by her allure, Jack goes to her house expecting additional interpretation in exchange for handyman work. What he receives is far more than he bargained for.

EXCERPT-

"You have such interesting hands," Jodie said, as she wiped my table. "You should let me do a palm reading sometime."

Her comment caught me by surprise, but her pale blue eyes drew me in, as they always did.

"What would that tell me?" I struggled to hold back the sarcasm.

"A lot about your future," she said, whisking my doughnut crumbs away.

"I could use some good news right now." I turned my palm up toward her.

"Not here," she said. "Come to my shop. I do readings on Saturdays."

"You have a life outside this coffee shop?"

"I do. This job earns me money while I build up my practice."

She reached into the back pocket of her tight fitting, low slung jeans, and produced a rumpled card.

"I guess I can relate," I said. "Handyman work supports my writing jones." I pointed to the tablet holding my latest scrawling. "But I thought gypsies were supposed to have dark eyes, black hair and..." I choked on the words.

"And big breasts," she said, turning her nearly flat chest toward me. "All that's true, but I've been trained by the best."

"Well, can you give me a little sample?" I asked, teasing, stretching my hand further in her direction.

She put down the dishrag, took my fingers, and traced a line in the center of my palm with her fingernail. It sent sparks through my body, directly to my groin. She broke into a lusty grin, her eyes dilated.

She leaned down to my ear and melted me with her hot, whispering breath. "You have a big cock and it's going to make someone happy, soon."

She turned abruptly and headed back to the counter area. I could only imagine how stupid I looked. The heat of my embarrassment turned my face into a red bulb. It was quickly replaced by the surge of lust I felt whenever I watched her walking away, her firm ass rippling atop her long, slender legs. How often I imagined those legs wrapped around me. I looked at my palm in disbelief.

How is it that women can say such outrageous things and get away with them? In my stories, I felt perfectly comfortable having my male characters say outrageous things to get a woman's attention. But I write fantasy.

Fireborn Flash Fiction Covers Unveiled

One of the things I adore about setting up my own publishing company is seeing it grow. Unlike most publishers I've dealt with, we're not just offering 3 or 6 choices for standardized covers for works too short for personalized covers. We're offering hundreds, in a full range of genres and content. We add more nearly every week. If you're thinking of submitting a short work...or just want to see some nice art, visit our Art Choices page and see what we offer.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

NEW SUMBISSION CALL!



Deadline: Ongoing through 2015
Title: Seeking works, mainly MM and ménage works, to balance catalog!
Genre: All romance, erotic romance, and erotica genres, especially SF/F/P/H subgenres
Word count: 5K and up, with a specific focus on 5-45K
Publisher: Fireborn Publishing
Acquisitions Editor: Brenna Lyons
EIC: Kathy Kozakewich
Contact: sales@firebornpublishing.com
Payment: 40% net sales on first two works, 50% net on third and further works placed with us
Description: Fireborn is seeking MM and/or ménage works, especially those between 5K and 45K, to balance out our catalog. We won't turn down a MF work or a longer work, but we're flush with them right now, so something different would go over well.
For more information:
http://www.firebornpublishing.com/Submissions.html
http://www.firebornpublishing.com/Authors.html
Be sure to read our author handbooks and our submission requirements.

The things authors should never do when approaching a publisher...

I've met my share of unprofessional authors in my time, and I keep reminding myself that these authors are in the minority. The purpose of this discussion is to get input from other authors and publishers on what authors should NEVER do. Let's make a list to help those who are coming in and need to learn the ropes. I'll start off with some of the ones I've seen.

1) Don't fail to look for and follow the publisher's submission guidelines. In addition to causing the publisher extra work to bring your book into line, it shows that you don't work well with a publisher. Rightly or wrongly, you will be judged by your initial contact with the publisher.



2) Don't fail to learn what industry standards are. Even if the publisher doesn't give guidelines, there is a minimum publishers expect for submissions. If you're using tabs or spacing in at the beginning of a paragraph rather than using the indent feature in a word processor, you've already made a bad choice. If you are using an atypical font or font size, you have as well. This is a profession, and you should know the basics of it, as you would in any profession.


3) Don't balk at the contract you've already signed. Your opportunity to want something changed was before you signed it, not afterward. Read, understand, and AGREE with the contract, or don't sign it. Badgering the publisher to make changes you aren't due is not a professional move.


4) Don't refuse reasonable edits. Even if you are writing in vernacular, there is a minimum of readability you have to reach, which may mean toning it down a bit. If you're not writing in vernacular, narrative does not enjoy the loose standards of grammar dialog would. Simple grammar and spelling should not be an editing "issue". Until the editor is trying to make substantial changes, you have nothing to complain about, and then...go through proper channels. Talk to the EIC or Senior Editor.


5) Even if you disagree with the publisher's reason for rejecting your work, do NOT argue with them about it. A rejection isn't personal. By acting so unprofessionally, you are MAKING it personal and demonstrating that you are not a good fit for working with a publisher. Furthermore, do not threaten the publisher, do not invite someone else in to argue with the publisher in your defense (you're not a 12 year-old), and do not tell the publisher he/she doesn't know what he/she is doing or that he/she will be sorry they aren't taking your "type" of work.


Beyond the fact that you've just burned your bridges with that publisher, you may have burned your bridges with other publishers that publisher is friends with. I'm not talking blackballing here, but when one publisher lets another know about the rough one they just dealt with, out of a desire to protect the second publisher's own company, he or she may ask the initial publisher to share the author's name. Out of professional courtesy, that's going to happen. Publishing, especially indie publishing of like genres, is a small group and many know each other. NEVER forget that.


6) DO NOT blame publishers for things beyond their control. When Amazon and the other distribution channels set up rules for what content they wouldn't take, books that were contracted in good faith and distributed were suddenly yanked from certain distribution channels. A surprising number of authors blamed the publishers for that turn of events, when the truth was that we had no control over it.


7) Never make your grievance public... Wait, let's rephrase that. IF the publisher is breaking contract, feel free to make a big deal out of it. If you just feel the publisher is wrong, ala #5 or #6, keep it to yourself. By screaming in a public forum about it and blaming the publisher, the author makes a fool of himself/herself and further alienates industry members who might have wanted to work with that author, until the outburst.


8) Be concise in your email correspondence. When you email the publisher, use your full pen name, name the book you are inquiring about, and be precise in what your question is. A publisher with dozens or hundreds of authors on board may have more than one with your first name, you may have more than one book with the publisher, and just asking "What's up with my book?" does not tell the publisher what the issue is, forcing the publisher to either ask you and waste time waiting for an answer or spend time trying to figure out your cryptic question while he/she could be doing something else?

Go to the direct person you need to speak to, when possible. If you send an email about your cover to your editor, the editor can't do anything but forward it to someone who might know, and that person might be an administrator who THEN has to forward it to the art director or cover artist. If you ask the art director or your cover artist a question directly, you have cut two email forwards off your wait time AND not wasted everyone else's time as well.

Use proper English (or whatever language you might be conversing in). You are a professional author. You deal with words. A publisher should never get an email from you full of IM or text speak. I'm not saying to fully edit every email. There is no editor in email, of course. I am saying that full sentences are appreciated.

9) READ your contract. I know I said that earlier, but this one is important. If a question is answered in the contract, do not email the publisher, asking the question. In fact, read all available information the publisher offers to authors, including submissions guidelines, handbooks, and so forth. You will feel more at ease and won't waste time on questions you should already know the answers to.

10) When a publisher answers a question for you, DO NOT continue to ask the same question. Moreover, DO NOT go from person to person in the company, asking the same question and expecting a different answer to it. Chances are, the company has already set standards/policy for what you are asking, and the answer isn't going to change, but you are going to wear out your welcome this way.

11) Be careful with how you compare companies. Demanding changes because you like how another publisher does something is only going to cause frustration on both sides. If it's important enough to you to be upset by it, consider giving your next book to the other publisher. It's okay to say "Have you considered...?", but what the publisher ultimately does is based on their comfort zones, not those of individual authors with the company.

Additionally, the publishers in question have a certain audience they have built up. That relationship comes with certain expectations. In specific, the readers know what to expect from the publisher and their offerings. If you submit to a publisher, and they tell you they tell you it doesn't fit, believe them. Don't argue it. Don't insult them for not taking "your" thing. It's not the right publisher for you, and that's not personal. Insulting them IS personal. No publisher "owes" it to you to accept your work. Move on to find a better fit for you. Moreover, nothing will get you put in the "never accept from this hothead" pile faster than that. 


So...what are your additions to the list?